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GtD Transforming Rehabilitation Event

Transforming Rehabilitation: Learning from the PbR results

Transforming Rehabilitation challenged Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) to reduce reoffending significantly and October will see the publication of the reoffending rates of the first Transforming Rehabilitation cohort.

These results are an important test of the government’s Transforming Rehabilitation agenda and the success of the new CRCs. Some CRCs will be happy with their results, while others will need to improve. The published results also provide opportunities to commission new services for offenders.

Besides the implications for policy and practice, the results also present an opportunity for your organisation to learn how best to reduce reoffending with the tools at your disposal. You might want to increase a CRC’s performance, identify “what works?” and roll that out across all your CRCs, or prove that your specific service will make the difference.

Come join our experts at our TR PbR event, to discuss what needs to be learnt, what is within your control, and how embedding impact analytics in your CRC or service delivery organisation will help you to reduce reoffending.

Transforming Rehabilitation: Learning from the PbR results

Tuesday 28th November

2 – 4.30 pm

The Space Centre

94 Judd St, Kings Cross, London WC1H 9NT

SPEAKERS:

Professor Darrick Joliffe, University of Greenwich

“How to measure the quality of relationships between offenders and probation officers.”

Darrick is Professor of Criminology at the University of Greenwich. Darrick is interested in the broad areas of developmental life-course criminology, programme evaluation, prison research and psychology, individual differences and offending. He has developed tools to measure the satisfaction of offenders and the quality of their relationships with probation officers, and has estimated the association between relationship quality and reoffending. Darrick will also chair a discussion after the presentations.

 

Dr Sam King, University of Leicester

“What is high quality offender management?”

Sam is an expert on offender management and rehabilitation, and has contributed significantly to developments in desistence theory. His talk will discuss the latest evidence on what makes high quality offender management and what can be implemented to reduce reoffending. Sam has published widely on probation work and desistence theory, and has helped CRCs to implement innovative offender management tools to measure offender motivation.

 

Jack Cattell, Get the Data

“Predict your PbR results and continuously learn how to improve them before they happen.”

Jack is an expert on the prediction of reoffending rates, and the analysis of how a probation service can audit and improve its reoffending rate. He has worked for the Ministry of Justice, former probation trusts and Sodexo Justice Service’s six CRCs on research and analysis projects. He heads up GtD’s thought leadership on the use of predictive analysis to improve adult and youth offender management.

Free event – register today! Places are limited.

 

Headed by Jack Cattell, Get the Data is located in the UK and USA. We are an international thought leader on how to reduce reoffending through high quality analyses of offender management data. We have delivered high-profile projects for the Ministry of Justice, HMPPS (formally NOMS), and the police. We are proud to provide our Social Impact Analytics service to Sodexo Justice Service’s six CRCs.

 

Youth Justice: Evidence Based Policy in 2017? Get The Data

Youth Justice: Evidence Based Policy in 2017?

This month has seen the publication of Lord Taylor’s Review of the Youth Justice System in England & Wales.

In his comprehensive report, Taylor makes a number of recommendations “to transform the youth justice system in which young people are treated as children first and offenders second, and in which they are held to account for their offending”.

Of particular interest to me was Taylor’s emphasis on diverting children out of the justice system, where possible, and directing the police, local authorities and health authorities to operate these schemes jointly. Taylor identifies such multi-agency leadership as one of the principles of good practice in diversion that includes, proportionality, speed, sensitivity to victims, light touch assessment and access to other services.

If these recommendations are implemented, then there are reasons to be cheerful about the future direction of youth justice in England and Wales. But, have we not been here before? It is nearly 20 years since Tony Blair formed the ‘New Labour’ administration in 1997, with its commitment to ‘evidence-led’ policy. Nowhere was this more evident than in the 1998 youth justice reforms and the creation of multi-agency Youth Offending Teams. “Tough on crime; tough on the causes of crime” was the slogan of the day, and I cut my evaluation teeth in the boom of criminological research and evaluation, and the search for “what works?” in youth justice.

Within a decade, however, the laudable attempt to re-set youth justice by informed policy had become jaded. Traditional law and order politics were reasserting themselves, something that Barry Goldston recognised in his excellent article “The sleep of (criminological) reason: Knowledge–policy rupture and New Labour’s youth justice legacy“. Giving his retrospective, Goldson identified a “trajectory of policy [that] has ultimately moved in a diametrically opposed direction to the route signalled by research-based knowledge and practice-based evidence”. In other words, the knowledge-base was telling policy makers to be doing one thing, but they appeared to be doing just the opposite.

In his article Goldson identified five areas where the rupture between the policy and practice was most evident: research tells us that young people committing crime is relatively ‘normal’ (but the response is to be intolerant of this); the evidence is that rates of youth crime are relatively low (but politicians tend to amplify it and “define it up”); evaluation shows that diversion is effective (but the response is for earlier intervention and ‘net widening’); universal services of welfare, education and health are effective (but punishment becomes ascendant while welfare is in retreat); decarceration is known to be cost-effective (but the use of custody increases).

The publication of the Taylor report provides us an opportunity to reset youth justice and its recommendations seek to repair the “knowledge-practice rupture”. Are we seeing an awakening of criminological reason? I trust we are and look forward to continuing to play my part in providing evidence of what works to policy makers and practitioners.

Juvenile justice

Preparing Tomorrow’s Juvenile Justice Leaders for Success

Preparing Tomorrow’s Leaders for Success. In delivering evidence of “what works?” GtD is working with juvenile justice leaders on both sides of the Atlantic. Recently, Alan Mackie demonstrated the ‘value of evaluation’ to a new generation of leaders at Georgia Gwinnett College. Using GtD’s evaluation of the Youth Restorative Intervention as a case study, Alan showed how evaluation provides definitive evidence of what works in reducing both reoffending and costs to the tax payer. Contact Alan via alan.mackie@getthedata.co.uk to learn how GtD can help your juvenile justice project.

Youth Justice Awareness Month

GtD: Supporting Youth Justice Awareness Month

October is Youth Justice Awareness Month in the United States. In asking “all Americans to observe this month by taking action to support our youth”, President Obama called on more to be done to give children and young people a “second chance”.  In emphasising the importance of education, particularly early-years education, the President said, “When we invest in our children and redirect young people who have made misguided decisions, we can reduce our over-reliance on the juvenile and criminal justice systems and build stronger pathways to opportunity”.

As I have observed before, policy makers on both sides of the Atlantic are currently working to divert young people out of custody – or from even entering the justice system at all. Undoubtedly this new policy direction is driven by the need to cut expenditure as keeping large numbers of young people in prison is simply no longer affordable. However, it’s clear that the policy shift is also motivated by the evidence that the most effective and least damaging forms of intervention are universal services that don’t “criminalise” young people, but seek to address their needs particularly their lack of attainment in education.

Over the past four years GtD has been proud to work with a range of organisations that have delivered better outcomes for young people, whether or not they were involved in the justice system. One of our first evaluation projects was to identify how an education and training project for disadvantaged youth could become more efficient and effective. Since then we have developed our CV of youth work to include: proving the effectiveness of a youth restorative justice intervention and, more recently, helping an organisation to learn “what works?” with developing resilience, independence and maturity in young people. And now we are looking forward to starting a new evaluation of an education, training and employment project for young refugees arriving in the U.S. Youth justice in the U.S. and U.K. is undergoing substantial reform, but there is much more to be done to help young people build, in the President’s words, “stronger pathways to opportunity”.

As a company GtD believes that we can support young people by working with policy makers and practitioners to determine what works best, and for whom. And as our CV demonstrates, successful interventions are delivered when our social impact analytics are integrated into the policy and planning processes. In doing so, GtD is helping our clients to learn how to improve their services and demonstrate their effectiveness.

In this Youth Justice Awareness Month, GtD is inviting youth organisations to contact us for a free 1-hour Strategic Impact Assessment where we’ll take the time to evaluate your current impact management success and identify key areas to develop in order to help your organisation maximise its support for young people. For more details, please contact me at alan.mackie@getthedata.co.uk. On behalf of GtD, thank you for your work with young people and I look forward to hearing from you.

Driving Improved Outcomes for the Juvenile Justice System Get The Data

Driving Improved Outcomes for the Juvenile Justice System

It was a great pleasure to attend the Coalition of Juvenile Justice’s annual conference in Washington D.C. last week. Under the title, “Redefining leadership: engaging youth, communities and policy makers to achieve better juvenile justice outcomes”, the conference convened a broad coalition of policy makers, practitioners, advocates, researchers and, importantly young people themselves.

Improving outcomes for our young people was a good theme for the conference. And it comes at a time when juvenile justice is undergoing substantial reform in states across the U.S. This includes my home state of Georgia which is considered to be in the vanguard of reforming states.

The motivation for reform appears to be driven by a humanitarian desire to end the use of custody for young people and improve conditions in jail.  It is also clear that the reform agenda is driven by fiscal realities and the need to reduce the cost to the taxpayer. The Department of Juvenile Justice in Georgia estimates that it costs upwards of $90,000 a year to house just one juvenile offender in one of its facilities.

Humanitarian and costs concerns are legitimate concerns in public policy, not least how we treat our vulnerable young people. However, we must guard against unfounded good intentions and the danger of delivering cut-price justice. Good juvenile justice outcomes should be about increasing protective factors, ending the “school to prison pipeline”, improving relations with the police and education authorities and – of course – reducing recidivism.  So it was heartening that the conference was committed to improving outcomes for the juvenile offenders, their families and communities as well as the wider juvenile justice system.

The key to achieving good outcomes lies in understanding the data, and I attend several seminars on data-driven decision making, with presenters demonstrating the use of data to model how their juvenile justice system was reformed to achieve improved outcomes. It was also good to learn more about current evidence based interventions that are successful in addressing the underlying factors related to offending behaviour. My own contribution was to present a poster on how evaluation provides empirical evidence of how and why an intervention has achieved its outcomes and what can be done to improve them.

Juvenile justice reform should be led by an empirical analysis of the data: what is effective and cost beneficial. Evaluation has a key role in this and as the current reforms are rolled out they should be evaluated and scrutinized to determine whether they were successful, how they could be improved – or even whether a particular reform should be reversed or altered.

If you would like to learn more about how evaluation can help you with your local reforms, please contact me at alan.mackie@getthedata.co.uk