Evaluation for accountability courts

Building on Success: Evaluation for Accountability Courts

Across the U.S. Accountability Courts are proving effective in reducing substance misuse and lowering recidivism. Once again, our home state of Georgia is in the vanguard of reform. Next week, GtD will be attending the annual conference of the Council of Accountability Court Judges of Georgia to show how evaluation can be used to build on these successes.   

Accountability courts provide interventions that address the mental health, substance misuse and other health issues that can be associated with an individual’s criminal behaviour. Designed to keep nonviolent offenders out of prison, those who are eligible will agree to completing a plan of action that includes counselling, support and regular drug testing by the court. While sanctions are imposed for those who violate a rule of the program or relapse, the court will be the forum for recognizing and congratulating an individual’s progress.

Once again Georgia is in the vanguard of criminal justice reform. Of the estimated 2,500 accountability courts in the U.S., 93 of them are in Georgia.  With the mounting evidence that they are successful in reducing substance misuse and lowering recidivism, there is also a good economic case to promote accountability courts over the use of jail. But if the evidence is there, what is the role of evaluation?  To answer this question GtD will be attending the annual conference of the Council of Accountability Courts of Georgia.

Building on Success

Although accountability courts can be successful, more can be done to improve, replicate and sustain this innovative approach. So, whether a new accountability court is being set up, an existing program is being extended or a funder needs evidence of impact, then GtD’s social impact analytics can provide definitive data to assist courts measure, learn and prove their impact.

Measuring

If a court is implementing a new program, GtD’s Impact Measurement Service will determine its intended impacts, how to measure them and identify what resources will be required. In providing this service we will collect data and report analyses that will be relevant to judges, court managers and practitioners.

Learning

GtD’s social impact analytics can help accountability courts improve their existing programs. Our Predictive Analysis service will help practitioners identify what is working best for offenders, and will provide information for managers to re-define high-quality interventions and deliver a more effective program.

Proving

Ultimately, accountability courts will want to prove their impact. Our rigorous Impact Evaluation service will provide definitive evidence of reductions in recidivism, lower substance misuse and the wider benefits to individual offenders, the local criminal justice system and community.

If you are attending next week’s conference, come by GtD’s table in the exhibition hall to learn more of the value of our social impact analytics for your court.